Saturday 6 April 2019
Cafe OTO
Curated by
Jennifer Lucy Allan

 

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Fresh Klang:
CRiSAP students
perform
Yoshi Wada

 

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Chiyoko Szlavnics

 

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Annea Lockwood

Cafe Oto, 18-22 Ashwin Street, London E8 3DL
£7 advance / £6 Oto members / £9 door / £5 students
Buy tickets here
Season tickets available here

Programme

19.30 Doors
20.30 Programme begins

Fresh Klang:

Yoshi Wada, Lament for the Rise and Fall of Handy-Horn, 1982

CRiSAP sound art students

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Chiyoko Szlavnics, This Is Only Here, 2010 and HC91, 2010

Royal College of Music Students

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Annea Lockwood, Water and Memory, 2017 (UK premiere)

12 vocal performers

Annea Lockwood

photograph by Ruth Anderson

Annea Lockwood’s compositions range from sound art and environmental sound installations to concert music. Recent works include bayou-borne, for Pauline, for 6 improvising musicians based on a map of the bayous in Houston, TX; Streaming, Swirling, Converging, an electroacoustic collaboration with Christina Kubisch for the 2018 Kubisch/Lockwood release on the Gruenrekorder label (The secret life of the inaudible), and Wild Energy, with Bob Bielecki – a multi-channel outdoor installation focused on geophysical, atmospheric and mammalian infra and ultra sound sources, commissioned by the Caramoor Festival of the Arts.

Her music has been presented in many venues and festivals including the  Tectonics/BBC Festival Glasgow, the Henry Moore Institute Leeds, the Lab, San Francisco, the Israeli Center for Digital Arts, Holon Israel, Issue Project Room, Brooklyn and the London Contemporary Music Festival 2018. Her works have been issued on CD, vinyl and online by Gruenrekorder, Black Truffle, Superior Viaduct, Lovely Music, New World, 3Leaves, XI, EM and other labels.

Chiyoko Szlavnics

Chiyoko Szlavnics was born and raised in Toronto, Canada, and has lived in Berlin, Germany, since 1998.

She studied music at the University of Toronto, and privately with the composer James Tenney.

She composes for a wide variety of instruments and ensembles, often combining them with sinewaves. A central aspect of her work is the audible phenomenon called “beating”, which is highlighted through her particular use of extended sustains, glissandi, tuning systems, and her way of combining acoustic instruments with electronics.

Drawings became the starting point for her compositional process around the year 2003. But in 2009 & 2010, several drawings series suddenly emerged, which distinctly belonged to the field of visual art. Szlavnics now practices in both disciplines, and not only are her drawings heard in concert, but her music is sometimes also seen in exhibitions in Europe and North America.

Yoshi Wada

Photograph by Marilyn Bogerd

Yoshimasa “Yoshi” Wada (born November 11, 1943), is a Japanese sound installation artist and musician living in the United States. He lived in New York City for many years but now lives in San Francisco, California.

Born in Japan, Wada joined the Fluxus movement in 1968 after meeting George Maciunas. He also studied with the North Indian vocalist Pandit Pran Nath. Wada’s works often incorporate the use of drone and are usually performed at very high volume, allowing for the overtones within the sound to be heard very clearly.

He frequently performs his own compositions, which feature much freedom of improvisation, on Scottish highland bagpipe and voice, and also employs a number of homemade instruments. These include “pipe horns” (very long horn-type instruments made from metal plumbing pipe) as well as large reed instruments involving multiple bagpipe-like pipes connected to a large air compressor; due to their appearance, Wada named these latter instruments “Alligator” and “the Elephantine Crocodile”. His music has been scarcely released on recordings, having seen only two LP releases, on the India Navigation (1982) and FMP labels. Lament For The Rise and Fall of Elephantine Crocodile, The Appointed Cloud and Off the Wall were reissued by Japanese labels EM Records and Editions Omega Point in 2008.

Wada is also known for his mechanical and robotic installations. In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the mid-1990s, he performed a whimsically entitled piece, Lament for the Rise and Fall of Handy-Horn, in which several compressed-air “auditory flare” signals used for nautical emergencies (the “Handy Horn” brand named in the title) were sounded for the duration of their usefulness, giving rise to an alarmingly high-decibel air-pressure environment and charged psychoacoustic environment. (Wikipedia)

“Yoshi Wada by Tashi Wada”, BOMB Magazine

Jennifer Lucy Allan

Jennifer Lucy Allan is a writer and researcher. She is currently working on a PhD at CRiSAP (UAL) on the social and cultural history of the foghorn, and is also a freelance music journalist specialising in underground and experimental music. Previously she was online editor for The Wire, and now freelances for The Wire, The Quietus, The Guardian and others. She runs the reissues label Arc Light Editions with James Ginzburg, and is a core member of Laura Cannell’s Modern Ritual Collective. She has recently guested on BBC3’s Late Junction, and written a series on life living in a lighthouse for Caught By The River.